Porsche 911 996 front exterior

Porsche 911 (996)

BUYER’S GUIDE

Porsche 911 (996) Review

Every 911 generation has its day and that moment may be coming at last for the unfairly maligned 996…

What Is It?

The moment the Porsche 911’s evolutionary curve suddenly steepened, and a dramatic departure from what went before in terms of both looks and engineering. Smoother, longer, wider and sleeker, it didn’t help the doubters that the 993 it replaced is, to many, the perfect intersection of 911 tradition and modernity.

A shared face with the baby Boxster, those ‘melted’ headlights, the frameless doors and more were certainly a shock to the system, the water-cooled engine likewise. But it’s still a Porsche 911. And while it’s taken the best part of quarter of a century for the shock to wear off the 996’s time may finally have come, with the window of opportunity to bag a good one while still relatively affordable narrowing by the day.

Corrosive Areas

Inner door catch body mounts

Rear inner wings and arches

Front edge of sills

Checklist

  • 996 Carrera 2 revealed at the 1997 Frankfurt show with an all-new platform and 3.4-litre, 300PS (221kW) liquid-cooled flat-six
  • Early cars with orange indicator lenses and cable-throttles (rather than by-wire) now desirable among discerning 996 buyers
  • All-wheel-drive Carrera 4 launched in 1998, with cabriolet following soon after
  • GT3 introduced in 1999 for 2000 model year with high-revving, motorsport derived ‘Mezger’ 3.6-litre engine and fixed rear wing
  • Found a suspiciously cheap GT3? It’s probably a Carrera with the optional Aerokit…
  • Second-generation GT3 from 2003, distinguished by flat-topped rear wing; more extreme RS obvious for blue or red on white graphics and colour-matched wheels
  • Turbo launched in 2000 with wide body, deployable spoiler, all-wheel drive, manual or Tiptronic transmission and coupe or cabriolet bodies
  • Original Turbo had 420PS (309kW), optional performance kit took this to 450PS (331kW)
  • Turbocharged GT2 based on Turbo but with rear-wheel drive and no driver aids; first batch produced in 2001 with 462PS (340kW) followed by another in 2003 with 483PS (355kW) and thumping 640Nm (472lb ft); both rare
  • PCCB ceramic brakes standard on GT2, optional on the Turbo and obvious by the yellow calipers; desirable for pose value but expensive to replace and many hard drivers prefer stock brakes
  • Wide-ranging update introduced in 2001 for 2002 model year with new lights, sharper front bumper and an increase to 3.6 litres on Carrera models; glass-hatched Targa introduced
  • M030 sports suspension excites many purists, though some consider it excessively harsh for road use
  • Galvanised body resists rust so any obvious corrosion could be a sign of crash damage – check for under carpets in nose compartment for tell-tale signs of repairs to front chassis members and for overspray on window seals
  • Door catch mounts on body one known rust spot, ditto dirt traps behind plastic rear arch liners and leading edges of sills exposed to stone chips from front tyres
  • Bumper mounted radiators and air-con condensers vulnerable to stone damage and corrosion if clogged with leaves and other debris, as is common
  • Rear Main Seal (or RMS) on crankshaft an oft-discussed weakness but if not leaking excessively (or already replaced) can be left until other engine-out jobs like clutch replacement
  • Weak Intermediate Shaft (IMS) bearing another much talked about issue and can wreck engine if not caught but specialists know the warning signs and most cars will by now have upgraded replacements – check history for proof
  • Crumbling cylinder liners on 3.4s and bore score on 3.6s the final known engine issue – it’s less common than thought but if not already done a pre-purchase borescope inspection can set mind at ease
  • Many cars will have been through a succession of short-term owners, who may or may not have kept up with maintenance – whatever the quantity of names on the V5, a fully documented service history with respected specialists is worth its weight in gold
  • Tiptronic autos cheaper to buy on account of being less popular so could be a bargain, though the rest of the running costs won’t be any less and they’re sluggish compared with modern PDKs
  • Handling should be crisp and precise – if it’s not then worn suspension bushings or parts like ‘coffin arm’ lower links may need replacing; this otherwise straightforward job can be made more difficult if bolts and fixings have rusted and seized

How does it drive?

The looks and engineering may have been a huge step but the 996 is still, unmistakeably, a 911 to drive. Feel to the surprisingly large steering wheel is light but a lesson in perfectly weighted assistance and feedback, Porsche’s signature attention to detail apparent in the harmonised response in pedals and shifter alike.

Best appreciated in ‘basic’ rear-wheel-drive manual Carrera form, the 996 is refreshingly delicate and light on its feet compared to newer 911s while still modern in feel but with that traditional light-nosed balance. As always the secret is to manage corner entry speed in the first instance, wait for the front axle to bite and then enjoy the rear digging in as you introduce the throttle.

All-wheel-drive Carrera 4s have greater wet weather traction, Turbos more of everything (a lot more) and each their fans but the extra horsepower and rubber arguably just put more distance between you and the fundamental joy of a well-sorted Carrera 2.

 What’s good?

See above for starters! The 996’s break from 911s of old may have dismayed traditionalists but as a liveable modern classic it’s a perfect blend of practicality, usability and fun, with welcome extra space inside and more conventional controls.

Refined on a cruise, entertaining on a blast and with that ever-present flat-six howl behind you it’s a Porsche you can enjoy with a clean conscience, the vast and knowledgeable community of specialists geared up to support you every step of the way whether you want to keep it stock or enjoy the interchangeability of parts and tuning potential to spice things up.

All things relative it’s still reasonably affordable as well, and while supplies of good ones are drying up and driving prices with them, the ongoing desirability of its 997 successor should – hopefully – keep a ceiling on values.

What’s bad?

The looks get better with age and the driving experience is brilliant but there’s no escaping the 996 will always be the ugly duckling of the 911 lineage. That swoopy ‘90s interior hasn’t dated so well either, and the quality of some of the fixtures and fittings is undeniably cheaper than what came before and followed.

Affordability is a double-edged sword as well, and while desirability is increasing many cars will have been through the hands of multiple owners more interested in ticking the Porsche ownership box than proper maintenance. You’ll have to wade through a lot of Tiptronics, Targas and cabrios to find the kind of 996 you’d really want to own as well, and accept the promise of a ‘cheap’ 911 becomes more fleeting as you hone your selection.

Some well-documented mechanical foibles like the intermediate shaft (IMS) bearing and scored cylinder bores will always cast a shadow over the 996 as well, even if most surviving cars will, by now, have had them addressed.

Which model to choose?

Money no object it would have to be a GT3 or GT3 RS for the thrilling blend of howling race engine, sharper handling and track-based cred, or a GT2 for rarity and the sheer intimidation factor. Turbos, meanwhile, offer a very different flavour of performance that appeals for the still formidable thrust, all-weather usability and more in the way of creature comforts and luxury. Though it comes at extra cost and complexity.

Carrera 4s have their fans, the Turbo-bodied C4S with its signature full-width rear lights especially popular. Cabrios, Targas and Tiptronics offer an affordable entry point to 911 ownership, though running costs will be the same so it may prove a false economy. Leading, inexorably, to the purest and most desirable 996 of the lot – a base-spec Carrera 2 with a manual gearbox.

Our money? It would be on one of the earliest 3.4s, with the original orange indicators and cable throttle, though any rear-driven stickshift coupe would do nicely.   

Specifications – 996 Carrera 2 Coupe

Engine

3.4-litre six-cylinder petrol

Power

300PS (221kW) @ 6,800rpm

Torque

350Nm (258lb ft) @ 4,600rpm

Transmission

Six-speed manual, rear-wheel drive

Kerb weight

1,320kg

0-62mph

5.2 seconds

Top speed

174mph

Production dates

1998-2005 (all variants)

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The best sportscars for under £100k

The best sportscars for under £100k

You’re hitting the upper reaches of middle age, the kids are safely dispatched to university and you suddenly find yourself with money to burn – could now be the time to blow £100,000 on the sportscar you always promised yourself?

Of course it is. And, with a healthy 100K budget behind you, you won’t be short of choices. This guide has everything from a mid-engined plug-in hybrid to front-engined GTs, rear-engined track refugees and a Ferrari estate. Here are the eight best sportscars available for no more than £100,000.

Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

The Corvette Stingray marked a turning point for Chevrolet. No longer was the company going to play also-rans to the European competition, this time it would face them head-on. To do it, the Stingray would be the world’s first mid-engined Corvette with more than a passing resemblance to the Ferrari 458, which Chevrolet benchmarked its car against. It’s unsurprising then that the Stingray features a 497PS (366kW) 6.2-litre flat-plane crank V8 that gets it from 0-62mph in under three seconds.

The accompanying howl has more than a hint of Maranello. With its mid-engine setup, the latest Corvette offers turn-in grip and corner-exit traction that the old model could only dream of. Sadly, the attainable pricing that makes the Corvette huge in the US doesn’t survive the UK tax system, but less than £100,000 for a brand-new mid-engined supercar still sounds like a bargain to us. 

Mercedes AMG-GT

The Mercedes-AMG GT was meant to be a more affordable replacement to the SLS – a stunning car that’s price put it out of the reach of most Porsche 911 owners. A sales no man’s land. To keep costs low, the AMG GT lost the SLS’ eye-catching gullwing doors, but the distinctive long-bonnet-stubby-rear shape remained.

Out went the old naturally aspirated 6.2-litre V8 and in came the ubiquitous twin-turbocharged 503PS (370kW) 4.0-litre V8 (that’s powered everything from the C-Class to the G-Class). Straight-line performance was guaranteed – 0-62mph took 3.2 seconds and top speed was 193 mph – but more surprising was the car’s handling balance thanks to a front-mid-engined layout and transaxle. Prices start from around £50,000 but you’ll need closer to £70,000 for a good one.

Lexus LC500

Lexus is no stranger to nosing its way into new markets – the inaugural LS400 beat the Europeans at their own game by being better built and more luxurious – but could it pull off the same trick with a sportscar? Of course it could. The LFA hypercar had already tenderised the market to the idea of a sporty Lexus when the LC500’s shape was revealed to dropped jaws at 2016’s Detroit motor show. Not only did it look gorgeous on the outside, inside it had a beautifully sculpted interior that would have looked at home in cars costing three times as much.

Power came from a Lexus 477PS (351kW) 5.0-litre V8 that rumbled at low speeds and thundered as the needle spun towards the rev limiter. Stiff suspension, meanwhile, prioritised handling, but the LC500 is still a car you can cover lots of miles in. With good LC500s starting from less than £50,000 – and with Lexus’ famous reliability at the top of our minds – it’s hard to imagine another sportscar that blends passion and practicality quite so well.

Aston Martin Vantage

The Aston Martin Vantage represented a new dawn for Aston, one where it borrowed engines and tech from Mercedes. Power came from the same twin-turbocharged 4.0-litre V8 as the AMG GT, producing 510PS (375kW) and giving the Vantage performance that its naturally aspirated predecessors could only dream of – 0-62mph took 3.6 seconds and onto a top speed of 195mph. Handling was also excellent. Matt Becker (former chief engineer of Lotus) ensured the Vantage offered grip and finesse that were unknown to the firm’s road cars up until this point.

Aston didn’t get everything right, though. The Vantage’s odd grille design divided opinion, while the cabin’s ancient Mercedes switchgear was poor for a near £150,000 GT. That’s less of an issue now you can pick up a good example for half the original price. 

Lotus Emira

Lotus fans are used to false dawns – who could forget Dany Bahar’s five-model reveal of the 2010 Geneva Motor Show, none of which came to anything. But the Emira looks like a car that could turn around the company’s fortunes. Mostly because it looks absolutely awesome. Ironically, under the new suit, there’s not much new about the Lotus’ bonded aluminium chassis or supercharged 365PS (269kW) 3.5-litre Toyota V6 – both of which are carried over from the old Evora.

Nevertheless, the Emira blends h serious performance and Lotus’ unerring ability to build a car that feels sharp and agile, but can also filter out the worst the UK’s crumbling road surface can throw at it. Prices start from under £85,000 for an as-new example.

BMW i8

The BMW i8 looked like nothing else on the road when it went on sale in 2014 because – as a plug-in hybrid, mid-engined sportscar – it was like nothing else. A combination of a 1.5-litre three-cylinder Mini engine with two electric motors meant the four-wheel drive i8 produced 374PS (275kW), got from 0-62mph in 4.4 seconds and topped out at 155mph. All while having a pure-electric range of more than 20 miles.

Sadly, while the performance was there, the i8’s handling fell wide of the mark expected of a truly engaging sportscar thanks to unnervingly light steering and a propensity to understeer. But if you’re looking for a sportscar you can use guilt-free during the week, while still enjoying it at the weekends, the i8 could be just the ticket. Good i8s can be picked up for less than £50,000 while Roadster drop-top will set you back closer to £60K.

Ferrari FF

Anyone who thinks a Ferrari sportscar can’t also be practical didn’t bet on the appearance of the Ferrari FF – a four-wheel drive shooting-brake estate, with a 6.3-litre V12 engine borrowed from the Enzo hypercar. With 659PS (485kW) to call on, the FF was predictable rapid – 0-62mph took 3.7 seconds, while top speed was a sky-high 208mph.

The four-wheel drive system was a masterpiece in itself. The FF was essentially rear-wheel drive up until it needed more grip, whereon power was sent directly to the front wheels via a separate gearbox. The result was un-ending traction, mated to razor-sharp steering and a fine-handling chassis that meant the Ferrari felt far smaller than it actually was.

Impressive, given the FF was a genuine four-seater with a 450-litre boot capacity. Sadly, this list of attributes doesn’t come cheap, with good examples costing every pound of our £100,000 budget.

Porsche 997 911 GT3

If you’re going to buy a sportscar on a budget of £100,000 then the Porsche 997 generation 911 GT3 could be the safest place to put your money. Like all Porsche GT cars, the 997 GT3 is a handling masterpiece offering up cornering grip and under-power traction that feels contemporary today. Although, unlike in the current model, the 997 GT3 comes sporting a feelsome hydraulic engine and a high-revving Mezger flat-six that’s become almost as acclaimed as the 911 itself.

The new version simply isn’t quite so spin-tingling. Despite all this, however, the 997 GT3 can still be sold as a sensible choice. It’s not too OTT for road use, while a boot under the bonnet and more storage, where you used to find on the back seat, means it can even claim to be practical…for a two-seater sportscar.

Best of all, it makes financial sense. Rock solid residuals mean the £80,000 you’ll need to buy a well-used-but-cared-for example, is exactly what you’d have paid new back in 2006.

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Porsche 911 G

BUYER’S GUIDE

Porsche 911 (G-Series) Review

The ‘impact’ bumper-era 911 may not have the romance of the ‘60s cars but still offers a cracking Porsche experience…

What Is It?

In its more than half century of existence the Porsche 911 has been in a constant state of evolution, ranging from the detail to the drastic. The arrival of the impact bumper G-Series in 1974 is arguably one of the more significant generational shifts, and though it too went through many iterations it lasted in fundamentally the same basic form until 1989.

Purists will point out the G-Series was just the first and, officially, the letter changed with each model year evolution but, for most people, this has become the catch-all designation by which all impact bumper cars are now known. For many years overlooked in comparison with the prettier ‘60s cars, appreciation of impact bumper 911s has grown, and with it values.

Sadly these are no longer the bargain they once were, though all things relative they remain a relatively accessible route into classic 911 ownership and feel considerably more modern and easier to live with than the earlier cars. While the G-Series provided the foundations for the legendary Turbo, spawned Targa and Convertible variants and limited-edition specials like the flat nose and Speedster the classic coupe in its Carrera, SC and later 3.2 are our main focus here.

Corrosive Areas

Front luggage compartment floor

Sills and inner arches, especially on ‘kidney bowl’ reinforcement panels

Sunroof drain holes and roof pillars

Checklist

  • Early cars used 2.7-litre engines as a carry-over, a naturally-aspirated version of the Turbo’s 3.0-litre motor arriving on the Carrera for the 1976 model year
  • From the 1978 model year the 3.0-litre SC engine became standard fit, the aluminium crankcase considered sturdier though power was down due to emissions regulations
  • The 3.2 introduced for the 1984 model year is another generation on and less likely to suffer obvious oil leaks
  • Early cars may have a four-speed gearbox but the five-speed ‘915’ gearbox was an option many buyers took up; the shift is less positive than the later G50 and requires an experienced hand to operate smoothly but a well set-up one should be satisfying to use; crunches or seriously baulky shifts may indicate a rebuild is necessary
  • Not sure if the 3.2 you’re looking has a 915 or G50 gearbox? The easy tell is the position of the reverse indent, which is up and to the left of first on the G50 and down and back from fifth on a 915
  • Engines should start first turn, idle smoothly, pick up keenly and show a steady oil pressure with revs once warm; smoke or hesitancy are warning signs of issues and, once removed for a rebuild, work can quickly escalate in complexity and cost depending on what is found
  • Timing chain tensioners on earlier engines can fail; more durable hydraulic ones from later 3.2 engines are a common upgrade
  • Rusty heat exchangers on the exhaust system are an expensive fix
  • Bodywork corrosion is the biggest worry on an old 911, even post-1975 models with the galvanised shell
  • Check every inch, preferably with the car on a ramp if you can; failing that remove mats from the front luggage compartment and inspect the condition of the floor, front crossmember, battery tray and then work your way back looking carefully at sills, inner wings, roof pillars, sunroof drains (where fitted), under the carpets and back into the rear arches
  • The so-called ‘kidney bowl’ reinforcements at the rear edge of the sills and within the B-pillars are notorious rust spot that require serious surgery to sort properly – beware any sign of bodged repairs in this area
  • Most cars will have had work done at some stage in their lives; in previous years when they weren’t as valuable this may have been more of the ‘quick fix’ variety so beware patchwork quilt repairs and instead hold out for one where you have evidence of a proper restoration by a respected specialist

How does it drive?

The word ‘unique’ is much over-used but, truly, nothing else drives like a 911 and a well-sorted impact bumper Carrera offers a fantastic balance of usable performance to be enjoyed as much on a long cruise as on a twisty back road or mountain pass. The small on-road footprint, the upright windscreen and excellent all-round visibility make it easy to place and very exploitable, there being surprising muscularity to the controls for what is a relatively light car.

Quirks like the offset driving position, floor-hinged pedals and wide-hipped stance soon become charming rather than strange, while the breathy bark of that air-cooled flat-six is a fundamental part of the magic. In standard form you’re looking at around 200PS (147kW) depending on the model and which engine it has, which sounds modest but translates to perfectly usable and enjoyable performance on the road thanks to the broad power band.

The much-hyped tail-heavy handling is less of an issue in these cars, especially when you get into the slow-in, fast-out groove the car naturally encourages through its very obvious feedback at the wheel. A good one is, quite simply, a joy to drive.

 What’s good?

Half a century on, the shock of the impact bumper look has subsided and appreciation of how neatly Porsche integrated this legislative requirement into the 911 shape has grown. The interchangeability of Porsche parts is, meanwhile, a blessing and a curse, meaning many G-Series cars have been ‘backdated’ to look like older ones, hot-rodded or otherwise modified.

This is all part of the scene but an original, wingless SC or 3.2 Carrera on Fuchs wheels has an elegant, late ‘70s simplicity about it many now covet. And with usable rear seats for the kids, good long-distance refinement and that iconic shape an impact bumper 911 makes for a very usable classic, more than capable of regular driving on modern roads.

There’s obviously a huge scene supporting these cars, and many talented and skilled specialists around to restore them and keep them running properly. Once you’ve had your fun a good one will always be in demand and easy to sell on to the next enthusiast seeking to live the air-cooled 911 dream, too.

What’s bad?

Given the impact bumper cars were, for a long time, considered the cheap route into classic 911 ownership and have now been on the road many decades many will have suffered from ‘make do and mend’ upkeep the inherent strength and build quality of the base car will have permitted. But these are still high-performance, precision instruments and any shortcuts by previous owners can bite you expensively on the backside if you’re suckered into a car that flatters to deceive.

Engines are inherently strong but big jobs and rebuilds quickly escalate in cost and complexity if you’re unlucky. But that’s nothing against the cost of sorting out a rusty car, of which there are sadly many lurking ready to tempt the unwary. Nothing comes cheaply with a 911 and a bad car could quickly land you multiple five-figure bills if you’re doing a proper job of it. Choose carefully, seek expert advice where possible and scrutinise every last bit of the history for a sense of what you’re getting into.

Which model to choose?

For years a forgotten model word is now out about the early mechanical fuel injection 2.7 Carreras, which basically ran the engine from the legendary 2.7 RS. These are now sought-after and valuable, the 3.0-litre ‘Carrera 3’ that replaced it in 1975 also highly regarded. The range was updated with a new 3.0-litre engine for the SC in 1978, emissions regs meaning it was actually down on power, though this was steadily addressed and balance restored by the early 1980s.

The big change came in 1984 with the introduction of the bigger, torquier 3.2-litre engine and, in 1987, the sturdier ‘G50’ gearbox. If you want a more modern feeling car these late versions have obvious appeal, though appreciation of the SC’s lighter, revvier nature has grown among purists and, if it was our money, an early ‘80s one with the 204PS (150kW) 3.0-litre engine, no wing and on Fuchs wheels would be top of the wishlist.

Targas and convertibles remain popular but, while they can be a bit more affordable to buy, they’ll be no cheaper to restore or run so the coupe remains the more desirable bodystyle.

Specifications – 1981 Porsche 911 SC 3.0

Engine

3.0-litre six-cylinder, petrol

Power

204PS (150kW) @ 5,900rpm

Torque

267Nm (197lb ft) @ 4,300rpm

Transmission

Five-speed manual, rear-wheel drive

Kerb weight

1,160kg

0-62mph

6.8 seconds

Top speed

146mph

Production dates

1978-1984 (entire G-Series production 1974-1989)

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Ferrari 365GTB/4 Daytona Coupe front exterior

Goodwood Classic Solutions at the 2023 Festival of Speed

Goodwood Classic Solutions at the 2023 Festival of Speed

Goodwood Classic Solutions is joining the action at the Festival of Speed this weekend. Anyone attending can also get into the draw to win two four-day passes to the Festival of Speed in 2024, simply by visiting us at our stand and getting a quote, or sharing your renewal date to get a quote later in the year. The view the full terms and conditions of the competition, click here.

Our friendly team of experts will be on hand to talk you through the options available to you with Goodwood Classic Solutions, while you can also get a closer look at three beautiful classics which will be on display at the GCS stand.

 

Learn more about everything going on at this year’s Festival of Speed.

We understand that every vehicle is unique, which is why our Agreed Valuation policies take the true value of your classic car into account.

We understand that every vehicle is unique, which is why our Agreed Valuation policies take the true value of your classic car into account.

1961 Jaguar E-Type 3.8 Series 1 Roadster

When the long, low and lithe Jaguar E-type was first revealed to huge gasps of delight at the Geneva Salon on 15th March 1961, no less than Enzo Ferrari described it as “the most beautiful car ever made.” This extraordinary high praise set the tone for the now-legendary E-type’s long and successful 13-year production run in both closed Coupe and open Roadster body styles.

The OBL Jaguars served not only as prototypes for the entire E-Type production run but also helped pave the way for the E-Type racers, with very few OBL cars alike, this example being the 88th RHD model built (on 21st July 1961).

Finished in its original dark Opalescent Blue coachwork with black folding roof, over a light blue interior (which is in fact grey), this is one of just five early examples finished in this striking colour combination.

Starting Insurance cost: £197.75 ( based on £99k value )

1988 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 ClubSport

The Porsche 911 ClubSport (option M637, often referred to ‘CS’) was based on the Model Year 1988 911 Carrera 3.2. The CS was designed as a lightweight project, saving some 70kg over the regular 911 coupe, achieved by eliminating the electric front seats, rear seats, rear wiper, spot lamps, sound proofing, and so on. Even the passenger sun visor was removed!

All but one of the 53 RHD UK-market CS models built (with 340 globally) were finished in Grand Prix White with red wheels and graphics, the unique exception being the reverse combination. With firmer suspension, stiffer engine mounts, LSD and a blueprinted engine, the CS had acclaimed handling and road manners to give a more involving and aural driving experience.

Starting insurance cost: £599.50  ( based on £127,000 value )

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 ‘Daytona’ Coupe

This evolution of the Ferrari 275 GTB4 was a milestone in the history of high-performance front-engined sportscars. Its sleek, modern and influential Pininfarina lines were matched by a development of the 4.4-litre V12 motor, fed by six Weber town-choke 40 carburettors, with an exceptional weight distribution provided by the rear gearbox transaxle to produce a GT of rare balance to guaranty a unique driving experience.

The 365 GTB/4 is more familiar to motoring enthusiasts as the Ferrari Daytona, although the model never officially carried that name from Maranello. With 1,284 examples of the sublime GT Coupe built between 1968 to 1973 as the last of the great V12 front-engined Ferraris of the era.

The example presented here is the more prolific ‘Series 2’ model, easily identifiable by its fixed quad headlights, mounted behind a clear Perspex glass cover. Just a handful of the earliest 1969 365 GTB/4 were with pop-up headlamps.

Starting insurance cost: £1,923.25 (based on £2 million value )
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